Monthly Archives: May 2011

Alan Kitching



Graphic designer, typographer, letterpress printmaker and teacher, Alan Kitching is internationally renowned for his expressive use of letterpress type, process and materials in creating typographic designs for publishing, advertising and his own limited edition prints and ‘Broadside’ publications.

Born in Darlington, County Durham in 1940, Alan left school aged 14 to become an apprentice compositor with a local printer. In 1961 he moved south to pursue a career in design.

Alan subsequently established his own design practice, taught at the Central School of Art, and was invited by Derek Birdsall to join the Omnific Design Partnership. He became visiting lecturer in typography at the Royal College of Art in 1988 and established his workshops there for students of all disciplines.

In 1989 Kitching decided to return to his letterpress roots and launched The Typography Workshop in Clerkenwell London with the first of his A1 ‘Broadside’ sheets – ‘an occasional publication devoted to the typographic arts’. Alan’s work has also featured on postage stamps, theatre posters, shop windows, billboards, signage and a 30 x 15ft typographic mural for the Guardian Newspaper’s London office.

In 1994 Alan met designer and writer Celia Stothard and they began collaborating on various projects. The Typography Workshop Printroom and Studio, a joint venture in two south London workspaces, was launched in September 2005.

Alan was appointed Royal Designer for Industry (RDI) and elected member of Alliance Graphique Internationale (AGI) in 1994. He was made Fellow of the Royal College of Art in 1998, and Visiting Professor at the London Institute (University of the Arts London) in 2001.








Alan Kitching is represented by Début Art
Contact the workshop

19 Cleaver Street , Kennington
London, SE11 4DP, GB –
T+44 20 7091 0772
F+44 20 7820 8098
typeworkshop@btconnect.com

Thomas Allen – book art


“Thomas Allen, in essence, is a still life artist who through a very creative process disrupts the stillness. By carefully selecting from primarily vintage paperback novels and science journals, he brings two-dimensional images forward into three dimensional space. With simple lightning and the use of simple tools (i.e., scissors and razor-sharp knives), figures are cut out, bent and juxtapose in ways that present the tension and dynamics of staged drama. Other techniques are applied in achieving a pure sense of humor that also defy the original use of these materials and their ultimate destiny of being read once and retiring for eternity on the nearest bookshelf.

Thomas Allen has a Master of Fine Arts from the University of Minnesota and a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Wayne State University in Detroit. He has been awarded fellowships from the Minnesota State Arts Board as well as the McKnight Foundation. He has exhibited his work extensively throughout the Midwest including the Rochester Art Center in Rochester, Minnesota, the Tweed Museum of Art in Duluth, Minnesota as well as numerous college and university venues. His work is incuded in several private collections including Target Corporation.”

   





s ee more of Thomas Allens work and more

Alvin Lustig


“Alvin Lustig’s contributions to the design of books and book jackets, magazines, interiors, and textiles as well as his teachings would have made him a credible candidate for the AIGA Lifetime Achievement award when he was alive. By the time he died at the age of forty in 1955, he had already introduced principles of Modern art to graphic design that have had a long-term influence on contemporary practice. He was in the vanguard of a relatively small group who fervently, indeed religiously, believed in the curative power of good design when applied to all aspects of American life. He was a generalist, and yet in the specific media in which he excelled he established standards that are viable today. If one were to reconstruct, based on photographs, Lustig’s 1949 exhibition at The Composing Room Gallery in New York, the exhibits on view and the installation would be remarkably fresh, particularly in terms of the current trends in art-based imagery.”

by Steven Heller – Eye Magazine 1993

  

    



This is just a small selection of the gorgeous covers Alvin did between
1945 – 1951 for New Directions: new classics.
All content from Alvin Lustig – Born Modern by Steven Heller


Visual Editions


Tree of codes by Jonathan Safran Foer • Published by Visual Editions
Design by Sara De Bondt Studio • Cover design by gray318

 

“Our early conversations with Jonathan Safran Foer aboutTree of Codes started when Jonathan said he was curious to explore and experiment with the die-cut technique. With that as our mutual starting point, we spent many months of emails and phone calls, exploring the idea of the pages’ physical relationship to one another and how this could somehow be developed to work with a meaningful narrative. This led to Jonathan deciding to use an existing piece of text and cut a new story out of it. Having considered working with various texts, Jonathan decided to cut into and out of what he calls his “favourite book”: The Street of Crocodiles by Bruno Schulz.

As Jonathan began to carve out his story, we started doing our production homework and literally got turned down by every printer we approached – their stock line being “the book you want to make just cannot be made”. Thankfully, we found Die Keure in Belgium who relished the challenge of making a book with a different die-cut on every page.

Over a year of writing, cutting and proto-typing later, comesTree of Codes, a haunting new story by Jonathan Safran Foer cut from Bruno Schulz’s words.

The book is as much a sculptural object as it is a work of masterful storytelling: here is an “enormous last day of life” that looks like it feels.”